Advantages Of A Buy Sell Agreement And Some Dynamics Of The Agreement!

It’s important to understand that every Buy and Sell Agreement (BSA) is different and has a separate purpose when put together and implemented. Because of the vast differences in BSA’s, using a standard form of BSA rarely accomplishes the needs and wants of the parties involved.

Each participant in the agreement has different purposes and objectives and looks at the transactions very differently. Neither party knows when the agreement will actually be needed, and what the triggering event will be. A triggering event could be death, disability, divorce, termination,  bankruptcy, and other defined events.   One thing that can is consistent in most cases is that when a triggering event happens, then each party becomes visionless to the other parties’ best interests, and only focuses on their own and best interests.

The two participants in a BSA are a seller and a buyer. They come in different forms, as individuals, trusts, or estates. Usually their purposes and objectives are very different, and there usually is a conflict between the parties.

While creating the BSA  the parties tend to be very fair before a triggering event. This is because everybody is in the same position and no one knows who will suffer the future triggering event. This is a positive viewpoint, as the parties are reasonable and objective about the possible and various scenarios. Everyone’s objectives are personal, and range from financial, tax, to personal protection for their families.  Having a designed BSA can offer the owners some satisfaction that their needs are documented and witnessed.

Objectives of BSA

  • To provide a predetermined roadmap for the business based on a triggering event which may call for the sale of a participant’s ownership interest.
  • To provide a guaranteed buyer for the owner’s business interest and to create a market for that interest.
  • If funded through life insurance or some other means, the BSA will provide liquidity for the payment of the business interest and help the estate pay for the estate taxes and other settlement costs of the deceased owner’s estate.
  • Can avoid an impasse between the parties in the event of a triggering event.
  • To protect the company and surviving shareholder from subsequent competition, should a terminated owner wish to sell to a 3rd
  • To avoid potential conflicts between the surviving owners and the deceased owners’ heirs, by creating a roadmap through the agreement at the owner’s death.
  • Can level the playing field for the estate or deceased owner’s as the agreement gives the deceased owner a say on how settlement of their interest will be to their heirs and estate. Especially, when the surviving family have little knowledge of the business entity.
  • Establishing the price and method of valuing the interest, establishing the terms of payments, and providing a method of funding for the payment of that purchase price.
  • Can create job stability for minority owners and key non-owner employees.
  • Can establish the value of the entity for tax purposes.
  • Can preclude owners from selling their interest without the consent of others thus avoiding the third-party ownership or voting percentages.
  • The agreement can restrict ownership to people who are actively engaged with the entity of full-time basis.
  • Can improve the credit worthiness of the entity.
  • Can avoid transfer violations/Licensing requirements.
  • Avoid transfers to individuals that would terminate the S corporation status.
  • Can dictate discounts for lack of marketability (minority interest discounts).
  • Can provide for voting agreements where necessary.
  • Can dictate what happens to in force life insurance policies on the terminated or surviving owners.

These are only a few of the many reasons for a buy and sell agreement, and the advantages of funding the agreement.

 

The Final Act! The Day Will Come! Part 2

In part-one of this article, I mentioned how purchasers will prefer to buy a business where everything looks good and there are no apparent problems. Smart and neat operations will attract serious buyers; however, this is only one part that is needed to achieve your selling objectives.

There should be no hidden problems or secrets which can jeopardize the purchase. Any undesirable factor not disclosed to the purchaser can lead to a non-sale, or at the very least, something they can use as a negotiating tool. The fact that a deal has fallen apart, is not only frustrating, but will cost you money, time, and distraction from your business.

An owner who unknowingly discloses secrets or situations in their business can end up becoming a deal breaker. Issues which are known need to be dealt with to have the best chance of a good sale. Since there may be issues which are unknown the best answer to this is to search for the problems in advance and take care of them. Think of this the same way you would treat the sale of your home. You would normally fix up, repaint, and clean up before you put the home on the market. You should do the same thing with your business.

Not only would you want your physical location to be clean and tidy, but this also flows over to the other parts of your business, such as accounting, financing, marketing material, department procedure manuals, and an array of other business items. Prepared written policies and procedures are a great selling point for a prospective buyer. Remember, when someone is interested in your business, it’s their team that inspects every aspect of your business in doing their due diligence. This is a micro inspection of all aspects of your business, so it will pay to make sure there isn’t a bunch of dirty secrets hanging around.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS AND PHYSICAL APPEAL
The first time a prospective buyer visits your company they make value judgements. They will observe everything from your reception area to your signage in and on the building. If the impression they get is positive, they will want to investigate your company more. You don’t want to lose their interest based on visual appeal of your business. No matter how good your business seems to do on paper, the prospective buyer may lose interest based on your first impressions.

This observation doesn’t end with just the building. Your premises, marketing literature, dress attire of you employees, uniforms, office settings, rubbish areas and a host of other areas should be updated and tidy. Continue reading “The Final Act! The Day Will Come! Part 2”

Planning For The Tax Efficient Insider Sale!

The sale of your business to an insider requires the simultaneous presence of a capable insider purchaser coupled with your intention to exit.   The reason is the “capable insider” who wishes to purchase your business is not interested in hanging around forever waiting for you to decide to sell.  Without   a solid commitment from you on the timing of your exit, prospective purchaser will ultimately become disinterested.

There is also the possibly of you having to finance part of the purchase price.    Chances are that you will be helping finance part of the sale, which represents actual years after your exit, which you are tied to the company.

Using a two-tier system for the purchase of your interest!

Under a two-tier   purchase system, a portion of your stock would be transferred to your inside buyer initially, and the balance would be transferred when the business is sold.

By using the two-tier purchasing system, there are a number of advantages:

  1. Providing stock ownership to a key employee today can provide incentives for better job performance.
  2. It can help reduce the risk that they will be attracted to a job offer from a competitor and ultimately leave you with your company secrets.
  3. Improves the likelihood of a bank financing the balance of their purchase in the future at your final exit.
  4. It gives them “skin in the game” when they contribute some of their funds to purchase some of the stock, giving them additional motivation to help the company be successful.
  5. Allows you to become a mentor to your key employee to further develop their skills under your watch, while still controlling the company.

Continue reading “Planning For The Tax Efficient Insider Sale!”

Building Business Value Techniques!

If you permanently left your company today, would it continue with little effect on cash flow?  If so, would you consider this a transferable value? Transferable value is a driver that is critical for business growth.

A company management team is instrumental in growing cash flow and business value.  When a business has the capabilities of having little disruption with its cash flow when an owner leaves, you have a valuable transferable value.  A key component of building transferable value is Next-Level Managers. Usually they are experienced working for larger companies. They know how to grow companies and know how to attract people with experience and the skill to help run a company.   This level of management will demand more money, perhaps ownership as a condition of employment.

Next level management (NLM) and future changes!

  1. To attract NLM, it involves training and coaching for the existing management. When adding NLM it may involve replacing current managers who underperform.
  2. The decision to replace existing management is difficult and hard for many owners, as current management members have been loyal to the company. However, they may be moved to another position with the same type of responsibility.  They are good employees, but NLM do a much better job in the management position.
  3. Engage management consultants and outside resources to create more growth. NLM work well with these professionals.
  4. Owners provide leadership and motivation for management. Owners should design plans that provide strong incentives to management to remain with the company beyond the owner’s exit.
  5. Motivate employees to perform at higher levels, create a culture.
  6. Financial incentives designed to grow cash flow or business value is more likely to achieve the value or cash flow necessary to support the owners’ exit goals and value growth of the company.
  7. Top management must stay in the business when owners leave, or they don’t have a transferable value and will not achieve the goals when the owner exits. Incentive benefit plans help keep top management employees involved after the exit of the owner.
  8. The use of a “non-qualified deferred compensation plan” or NQDC Plan which involves a benefit formula and vesting schedule, highly motivates management to stay on.
  9. When you cobble the benefit formula to a performance benchmark it is possible to increase cash flow and profitability for the company.
  10. The vesting schedule in the benefit it makes it hard for the top management person to leave. They will leave too much on the table. The vesting schedule give the employer the benefit of keeping a top level management.  The employee benefits as the company can offer a richer benefit knowing the reward the employee receives is tied into the company’s profitability.
  11. The appeal of incentive plans for key employees (management) is understandable: To create transferable value, someone other than the owner must be similarly motivated to grow value and the cash flow necessary to achieve the owner’s exit goals and continue the company beyond the owner’s exit.

Operating Systems That Enhance The Transferable Value Of A Company!

Continue reading “Building Business Value Techniques!”

The Small Issues Which Business Owners Need To Know About!

The Small Issues Which Business Owners Need To Know About!

When working with business owners, it is important to communicate many of the overlooked issues which may blindside them and cause disaster in their financial future.

Small issues turn into major problems bringing with them costly consequences. Many of them are obvious, and can be game changers in your future.

Whether you are an advisor or a business owner, some of the ideas I put forth will help you communicate these overlooked issues.

Estate Planning

I am sure if you asked 10 people to describe what estate planning is in one sentence, you would get 10 different answers.

At one time most advisors and business owners  would suggest that estate planning is about reducing taxes.  However, I would disagree that estate planning is just  about paying death taxes and mitigating estate costs.

To me, estate planning consists of three phases, creation, preservation, and distribution.  Each of the phases is distinct in and of themselves.

Creation is the concept of money, and accumulating.  Implementing strategies, which allow estate owners to create wealth, and avoid losing wealth by making financial mistakes.

Preservation is about protecting what you have from, inflation, lawsuits, expenses, and taxes. 

Distribution is the orderly distribution to your heirs.  It also is   a phase where the estate owner can distribute wealth to certain beneficiaries, at the least cost possible.

DORIS DAY:  THE EXAMPLE

Doris Day’s husband died in his 60’s.  He had taken care of all the financial areas of their life.    After his death, Doris Day did not know what she had, or what she owed.  The net result was she ended up owing a fortune to the IRS, in income and estate taxes.

Business owners not only have needs as business owners, but also have needs as individuals. Consequently, it’s not only the business planning that needs attention, but also a coordination of their personal situation.     In many situations, the owner’s planning is more complex because of the business ownership.

Continue reading “The Small Issues Which Business Owners Need To Know About!”

Will You Go Broke Selling Your Business?

If I sell my business today, pay my taxes, brokers and professional advisors, and  “I then invest the remainder conservatively, will I still be able to enjoy my current lifestyle?” Most business owners have asked themselves this question. After building a successful business, they wonder if they will net enough cash from its sale to maintain their standard of living. Often, after calculating the potential returns of investing the sale proceeds, they realize they can make more money by holding onto the business and becoming “passive” owners.

Continue reading “Will You Go Broke Selling Your Business?”